360-742-3492

Podiatry Associates, PLLC provides complete medical and surgical care of the foot and ankle to children, adults and seniors. Most foot problems can be treated conservatively avoiding the need for surgical correction. We believe our patients deserve to have the information needed to make good choices about their foot and ankle care. Our goal is to educate each patient and begin a relevant treatment program with the highest quality of care available. Whatever your foot and ankle trouble, we'll work together to find the answers to bring you relief.

Regular foot care can keep your feet from unnecessary injury and pain. Most people experience foot problems at some point during their lives. With proper detection, intervention, and care, most foot and ankle problems can be lessened or prevented. We look forward to meeting your treatment needs in the future. Our courteous staff is here to help serve your needs and address any questions or concerns.

Dr. Molina K Kochhar

Dr. Kochhar has been practicing in Olympia since 2002. She and her husband have four children. In her free time, she enjoys spending time outdoors with her family.

College:

Pomona College, Claremont, CA

Medical School:

California College of Podiatric Medicine in San Francisco, CA

Residency:

One year rotating podiatric internship, VAMC,Albuquerque, NM
One year surgical podiatric residency, VMAC, Albuquerque, NM
One year surgical podiatric residency, Kaiser, Walnut Creek, CA

Board Certification:

Diplomate, American Board of Podiatric Surgery

Memberships:

American Podiatric Medical Association,
Washington State Podiatric Medical Association

Hospital Affiliations:

Providence St. Peter Hospital,
Capital Medical Center

Dr. Nicole S Carney

Dr. Carney has been practicing in Olympia since 1999. She and her husband have four children. In her free time, she enjoys running, hiking, and spending time with her family.

College:

University of California at Davis

Medical School:

California College of Podiatric Medicine

Residency:

Surgical: VA Palo Alto & Stanford Health Services

Board Certification:

American Board of Multiple Specialties in Podiatry

Memberships:

American Podiatric Medical Association,
Washington State Podiatric Medical Association

Hospital Affiliations:

Providence St. Peter Hospital,
Capital Medical Center

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Footcare Facts

Heel Pain (Plantar Fasciitis)

Heel pain is most often caused by plantar fasciitis, a condition that is sometimes also called heel spur syndrome when a spur is present. Heel pain may also be due to other causes, such as a stress fracture, tendonitis, arthritis, nerve irritation, or, rarely, a cyst.

Toe and Metatarsal Fractures (Broken toes)

The strucrure of the foot is complex, consisting of bones, musdes, tendons, and other soft tissues. Of the 26 bones in the foot, 19 are toe bones (phalanges) and metatarsal bones (the long bones in the midfoot). Fractures of the toe ard metatarsal bones are common and require evauation by a specialist.

Ingrown Toenail

When a toenail is ingrown, it is curved and grows into the skin, usually at the nail borders (the sides of the nail). This digging in of the nail irritates the skin, often creating pain, redness, swelling and warmth in the toe. If an ingrown nail causes a break in the skin, bacteria may enter and cause an infection in the area, which is often marked by drainage and a foul odor. However, even if the toe is not painful, red, swollen or warm, a nail that curves downward into the skin can progress to an infection.

Peroneal Tendon Injuries

A tendon is a band of tissue that connects a muscle to a bone. The two peroneal tendons in the foot run side-by-side behind the outer ankle bone. One peroneal tendon attaches to the outer part of the midfoot, while the other tendon runs under the foot and attaches near the inside of the arch. The main function of the peroneal tendons is to stabilize the foot and ankle and protect them from sprains.

Morton's Neuroma (Intermetatarsal Neuroma)

A neuroma is a thickening of nerve tissue that may develop in various parts of the body. The most common neuroma in the foot is a Morton’s neuroma, which occurs between the third and fourth toes. It is sometimes referred to as an intermetatarsal neuroma.

Corns

A corn is a small circular thickened lesion in the skin of the foot. It usually forms due to repeated pressure on the skin, such as the rubbing of a shoe. The name "corn" comes from its resemblance to a kernel of corn. A corn is different from a callus in that it has a central core of hard material.

Bunions (Hallux Abducto Valgus)

A bunion (also referred to as hallux valgus) is often described as a bump on the side of the big toe. But a bunion is more than that. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the bony framework of the front part of the foot. The big toe leans toward the second toe, rather than pointing straight ahead. This throws the bones out of alignment—producing the bunion’s bump.

Calcaneal Apophysitis (Sever's Disease)

Calcaneal apophysitis is a painful inflammation of the heel’s growth plate. It typically affects children between the ages of 8 and 14 years old, because the heel bone (calcaneus) is not fully developed until at least age 14. Until then, new bone is forming at the growth plate (physis), a weak area located at the back of the heel. When there is too much repetitive stress on the growth plate, inflammation can develop.

Pediatric Flatfoot

Flatfoot is common in both children and adults. When this deformity occurs in children, it is referred to as pediatric flatfoot. Although there are various forms of flatfoot, they all share one characteristic—partial or total collapse of the arch.

Ankle Sprain

An ankle sprain is an injury to one or more ligaments in the ankle, usually on the outside of the ankle. Ligaments are bands of tissue—like rubber bands—that connect one bone to another and bind the joints together. In the ankle joint, ligaments provide stability by limiting side-to-side movement.

Hallux Rigidus

Hallux rigidus is a disorder of the joint located at the base of the big toe. It causes pain and stiffness in the joint, and with time, it gets increasingly harder to bend the toe. Hallux refers to the big toe, while rigidus indicates that the toe is rigid and cannot move.

Hammertoe

Hammertoe is a contracture (bending) deformity of one or both joints of the second, third, fourth or fifth (little) toes. This abnormal bending can put pressure on the toe when wearing shoes, causing problems to develop.

Achilles Tendon

The Achilles tendon is a band of tissue that connects a muscle to a bone. It runs down the back of the lower leg and connects the calf muscle to the heel bone.

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